The Main Collection - The official general plant pathological collection for Denmark – University of Copenhagen

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The Main Collection - The official general plant pathological collection for Denmark

The Main Collection is internationally recognised, and it is identified by the code CP in the international register of scientific herbaria/collections.

Plant material showing symptoms of abiotic factors (edafic adverse conditions), teratisms, believed to be caused by genetic abnormalities, and infectious diseases, primarily caused by fungi, bacteria, virus, mycoplasmas and higher plants constitute the majority of the collection. In addition a vast number of fungal structures (e.g. fruiting bodies) are included. Certain special collections are incorporated into in the main collection as well, such as a considerable number of marine fungi.

Type specimens

The collection includes type specimens i.e. the original specimen from which a species was described. Such material provides an essential basis for work on taxonomic revisons, as well as specimens from the entire collection. For this reason, items are frequently required by scientists all over the world, and lent out on demand for this purpose. 

The collection in addition serves as a basis for studies of the development and dispersal (in time and space) of plant pathogens and certain saprotrophic organisms as well in Denmark.

An extremely important purpose of the collection is to work as a reference collection, used as an aid in the identification of e.g. newly found plant pathogenic fungi, in case of difficulties in diagnosis. Furthermore items from the collection are used for demonstration purposes in the training courses of students in plant pathology.

Unique collection

The collection is believed to be unique in the Nordic Area. Its size and the long period spent for collection makes it internationally significant too. All types of known teratisms on woody and herbaceous plants are represented, in many cases the most conspicuous and significant samples observed during more than a century.

Associate professor Eigil de Neergaard has for many years been curator for the collection.